"QCI saved my life. I was having to pay a lot of of my money to see a doctor. I was told about QCI and filled out the paper work, not thinking I would hear back. QCI gave me a doctor, therapist, nurse, [and] community support. They really helped me when I was really sick and needed that. Now I am better and don’t need that [level of service]. I was helped to get Metro Access and now I can go get to my appointments on my own. I’ve been lucky to have met my therapist, Allison. She is really into the job. She helped me get my immigration card for free. We work together really well."  -- MS

On “Freedom’s Eve,” or the eve of January 1, 1863, the first Watch Night services took place. On that night, enslaved and free African Americans gathered in churches and private homes all across the country awaiting news that the Emancipation Proclamation had taken effect. At the stroke of midnight, prayers were answered as all enslaved people in Confederate States were declared legally free. Union soldiers, many of whom were black, marched onto plantations and across cities in the south reading small copies of the Emancipation Proclamation spreading the news of freedom in Confederate States. Only through the Thirteenth Amendment did emancipation end slavery throughout the United States.


But not everyone in Confederate territory would immediately be free. Even though the Emancipation Proclamation was made effective in 1863, it could not be implemented in places still under Confederate control. As a result, in the westernmost Confederate state of Texas, enslaved people would not be free until much later. Freedom finally came on June 19, 1865, when some 2,000 Union troops arrived in Galveston Bay, Texas. The army announced that the more than 250,000 enslaved black people in the state, were free by executive decree. This day came to be known as "Juneteenth," by the newly freed people in Texas. “FOn “Freedom’s Eve,” or the eve of January 1, 1863, the first Watch Night services took place. On that night, enslaved and free African Americans gathered in churches and private homes all across the country awaiting news that the Emancipation Proclamation had taken effect. At the stroke of midnight, prayers were answered as all enslaved people in Confederate States were declared legally free. Union soldiers, many of whom were black, marched onto plantations and across cities in the south reading small copies of the Emancipation Proclamation spreading the news of freedom in Confederate States. Only through the Thirteenth Amendment did emancipation end slavery throughout the United States.

Pride and Mental Health


Pride Month is a time for LGBTQ+ folks to gather and celebrate their freedom to live authentically. The LGBTQ+ community deserves affirmed, safe, supported, joyful, and mentally healthy lives.

Anti-trans legislation, hate-based crimes, and discrimination shouldn't overshadow Pride, but they can't be ignored. We hope those struggling with their identity or living in unsupportive environments find these resources helpful to living a life of well-being and resilience.

Click here to learn more from Mental Health America's LGBTQ+ Mental Health Resource Center.

If you are experiencing a mental health medical emergency, all 911 or go immediately to the closest emergency room.

CARF International, a group of companies that includes CARF Canada and CARF Europe, is an independent, nonprofit accreditor of health and human services. Toll free (888) 281-6531. www.carf.org 


QCI provides services for English speaking patients at this time. QCI will attempt to direct non-English speaking individuals to appropriate resources to the best of our ability.

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